AccessAgility Blog

Concurrent Number of Users on a Single Access Point

[fa icon="calendar'] Dec 14, 2018 9:48:19 AM / by Bradley Roar posted in bandwidth, Access Point, WiFi Design

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Most, if not all, businesses have completely converted to a wireless solution for their employees and guests. But with wireless connectivity, there are both advantages and disadvantages. One element of designing a wireless network is determining the number of concurrent users that can be connected to a single access point (AP) at any given time. This number will typically depend on the type of work that the users are conducting on the network. For example, if users are performing basic tasks like checking emails, they won’t need as much bandwidth which would allow for more users on a single AP. However, it is hard to determine which users will be on which APs and what they will be doing. Therefore, there is a specific number that is suggested in order to prevent potential network issues.

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WiFi Antenna Types

[fa icon="calendar'] Dec 7, 2018 11:15:04 AM / by Austin Hurd posted in WiFi Design, WiFi Basics, Signal

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Several varying types of antennas exist for WiFi, each with a specific purpose for how and when they should be used. Different types of antennas can be found anywhere from small office settings to outdoor camping grounds. While there are many types of antennas, all of them have the same purpose: producing radio waves to send information through the air. The three main antenna types are omnidirectional, semi-directional, and highly directional.

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Measuring Client WiFi Health

[fa icon="calendar'] Dec 3, 2018 4:05:27 PM / by Blog Team posted in WiFi Basics, WiFi Health

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Clients that use WiFi can experience a number of issues that can affect the speed and performance of a wireless network. Below, we have listed out a variety of simple tests that give users a basic look at client health. While additional tests may be needed to fully troubleshoot an issue, the following tests are a great starting point.

 

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Captive Portal Benefits

[fa icon="calendar'] Nov 30, 2018 9:50:05 AM / by Blog Team posted in WiFi Security, Managed WiFi

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A captive portal is a web page that a user is prompted with when connecting to a public access WiFi network. The captive portal states the terms, agreements, and acceptable usage policy for the user and then permits usage of the guest network upon the user’s acceptance of the policies. There are a handful of benefits that come with using a captive portal, including the ability to separate network traffic, limit data usage, collect valuable data, marketing and business recognition, and liability protection. With all of these benefits, there is very little reason to not have a captive portal as the gateway to your guest network.

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The Benefits of Subnetting

[fa icon="calendar'] Nov 16, 2018 3:21:03 PM / by Blog Team posted in WiFi Security, Managed WiFi

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What is subnetting, what is it used for, and why is it important?

Subnetting is the practice of dividing up a network into two or more networks. Common advantages of subnetting include enhancing routing efficiency, network management control, and improving network security. While these are just a few of the benefits that subnetting provides, they are the most noticeable after immediately implementing a subnet system.

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WiFi 6, WiFi 5, WiFi 4: New Generational WiFi Names from the WiFi Alliance

[fa icon="calendar'] Oct 19, 2018 12:52:12 PM / by Blog Team posted in Wireless

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WiFi Alliance is a non-profit organization that promotes WiFi technology and certifies WiFi products for conformity to certain standards of interoperability. While the WiFi Alliance owns the WiFi trademark, manufacturers may use the trademark to brand certified products that have been tested for interoperability.

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Cable Types: Cat5e, Cat6, Cat6a

[fa icon="calendar'] Oct 12, 2018 3:32:27 PM / by Hunter Bailey

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While there are many types of cable, there are three main types, or categories, of Ethernet cable that are commonly used for network deployments: Cat5e, Cat6, and Cat6a. Each of these cables are constructed of fundamentally similar twisted pairings of copper cables, and are each used with the same RJ-45 connection to plug into computers, routers, switches, or other network equipment. There are reasons for and against the use of all three, such as cost, ease of installation, and performance.

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Cabling and Pathways: Best Practices for an Office Setting

[fa icon="calendar'] Oct 5, 2018 10:11:16 AM / by Austin Hurd posted in Install, ap placement, cabling

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There are wires in wireless networks? Yes, and probably more than you think. For an office’s wireless setup, there are wires and cables that need to be run throughout the entire office. In this post, we will be talking about the basics that are required in order to prepare and execute the pathways and cabling in an office setting.

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Access Point Hanging Techniques

[fa icon="calendar'] Sep 28, 2018 10:44:12 AM / by George Earle posted in Install, ap placement

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Where and how an access point (AP) is hung is a simple process that requires planning and logical decision making based on a handful of factors, including the surface material, the mounting type of the access point, and the neighboring entities. Using a combination of proper mounting equipment and precise placement allows for an access point to perform to the best of its ability.

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Understanding Intrusion Detection and Prevention Systems

[fa icon="calendar'] Sep 21, 2018 10:07:01 AM / by Keith Hutton posted in WiFi Security, Managed WiFi, WiFi as a Service

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An intrusion detection system (IDS) monitors network devices in order to grant security administrators the ability to identify attacks in progress and take appropriate action to protect a network. In order for users on a network to access a web server on the internet, the firewall must allow traffic through port 80. However, this open port is often used as an attack vector for hackers and malware to gain access to your network. An IDS examines this traffic and compares it with known exploits; similar to how antivirus software uses known virus signatures to identify threats. When the intrusion system detects a match to a known exploit, it sends an alert to the security or web server administrator so they can take action. Intrusion prevention systems (IPS) are very similar to IDSs, but as opposed to just sending an alert, these systems go one step further and automatically take action to prevent an intrusion.

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